Faculty Workshop 2012 - Library breakout session

 

How can I keep up with developments in my areas of interest?
How can I get to library holdings more quickly?
How do I quickly and easily get print books not held by the library?
How do I search for books (etc.) on my mobile device?
What’s the best way to read library e-books on a mobile device?
How do I get in-depth scholarly background on a specific Bible passage?
What's the best way to share online library resources with students?
How can I be the first to find out about library news?
How can I help students who struggle with research?
How do I suggest additions to library collections?
How can I keep track of my research sources?
Can my students text the library?
How can I see who has cited a source?
How can I get students beyond Wikipedia?




 

How can I keep up with developments in my areas of interest?

Both Google Scholar and EBSCOhost databases allow you to set up an e-mail alert when something is newly indexed on topics of interest.

 

Google Scholar   

EBSCOhost

 

 

How can I get to library holdings more quickly?

Download the LibX toolbar for Firefox. This browser plug-in uses a variety of methods to get you closer to the library's resources, including a multi-database search tool that's always just one click away, and right-click context menus for a variety of library resources. Once it has been activated, you will see this button in your browser:

 

How do I quickly and easily get print books not held by the library?

"Camino" is a new group of California academic libraries with special interlibrary loan arrangements through a shared group catalog. This will result in more reliable and expedient fulfillment of requests for books from outside the scope of our local collections. This service is coming soon, and we will update this space when more information is available.

 

How do I search for books (etc.) on my mobile device?

The "Bookmyne" mobile app allows clean, easy mobile access to the library catalog (Webcat). Currently available as a free download for Apple devices and Android devices.

 

What's the best way to read library e-books on a mobile device?

Most of the library's e-books are hosted either by ebrary or Springer. Springer provides chapter-level PDFs, so you may simply download the PDFs to your device. For ebrary books, you can download the ebrary mobile app, currently available as a free download for Apple devices and Android devices.

Please note that the ebrary app requires a Facebook account in order to authenticate yourself as being from CBU. This is a multi-step process, but it only needs to happen once:

1. Sign in to ebrary using your LancerNet ID and password. (If you are on campus, you may need to click "Sign In" in upper right corner.) Once you are signed in, you will see "Signed in as: [your ID]".
2. Then, click “My Settings” in the upper right corner.
3. Under “Link your account to Facebook“, click “Log In“.
4. Log into Facebook.
5. Your ebrary account is now linked to your Facebook account. You can now sign in on the mobile app using the “Sign in with Facebook” button. Important note: The Facebook sign-in feature does not access or post anything on Facebook accounts. It only takes advantage of Facebook’s authentication controls.

With the ebrary app, you can also download entire e-books to your mobile device if you have an Adobe ID. To create your own free personal Adobe ID, click here.

How do I get in-depth scholarly background on a specific Bible passage?

ATLA Religion database indexes scholarly journal articles by Bible passage. In the ATLA database, just click "Scriptures" at the top of the window, then browse to the relevant passage – either a book, chapter or verse.

What's the best way to share online library resources with students?

If available, use the “Permalink” feature to copy and paste a persistent URL. These URLs can be used in Blackboard, e-mails, and any other relevant documents. For e-books, you can also use the permalink to the catalog record.

EBSCOhost

Library catalog (Webcat)

There are two rules of thumb for copying links that will work for everyone:
        Is it persistent? To test, copy and paste it into a new browser session. Does it still work?
        Will it work from off-campus? To test, check to see if “calbaptist” appears anywhere in the URL. If it does, it should work from off-campus. If “calbaptist” doesn’t appear, try pre-pending the following to the URL: http://libproxy.calbaptist.edu/login?url= . For example, http://www.ebscohost.com would become http://libproxy.calbaptist.edu/login?url=http://www.ebscohost.com

How can I be the first to find out about library news?

Two good options:

Watch the "News" section on the library website.

Follow us on Twitter.

How can I help students who struggle with research?

You can always send them to a librarian for one-on-one research assistance. In these cases it is helpful (but not necessary) for the student to make an appointment and to provide a copy of the prompt for any assignments in question. If they are just starting out with academic research, they may also benefit from viewing the library's instructional video tutorials and other online aids, available here.

How do I suggest additions to library collections?

Tell us about it! We always want to hear about what you and your students need. Generally, the relevant contacts are Elizabeth Flater for books and audiovisual materials, Barry Parker for journals, and Matthew Goddard for databases.

How can I keep track of my research sources?

Zotero is a wonderfully helpful browser plug-in for Firefox that allows researchers to keep their information sources organized. See here for more information and to install: http://www.zotero.org/ 

Can my students text the library?

Yes, and you can too! Send us a text at (951) 221-4228. If we're available, you'll get a response right away. Otherwise, we'll receive your text and respond to it as soon as we can. (Best limited to simple queries.) Click here for other ways of contacting us.

How can I see who has cited a source?

While it is not authoritative, Google Scholar does attempt to provide a list of books, articles, etc., that cite a particular scholarly work. To use this feature, simply search in Google Scholar for the source in question. Where the work in question appears in the results list, any works known to cite it will be provided by a link that says “Cited by…”

How can I get students beyond Wikipedia?

Reference Universe, a brand new addition to the library's tools, is an index of the tables of contents and indices of academic reference materials. By allowing you to search at once the library’s print and online reference collections, it provides a very simple and effective way to find trustworthy academic overviews of topics, definitions, and suggestions for further reading.